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Planning a visit to Kauai? We regularly add news and information about events, activities, and places to see on The Garden Isle.

About The Author

Sheila Heathcote has lived in Hawaii since 1986. She's a published author on the topic of Kauai and the owner of Hale O Nanakai Bed & Breakfast.

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Monday
Dec272010

Travel into Kauai's History - Kilohana, Grove Farm & Kauai Museums

Wondering what there is to do on Kauai on a rainy day? Plenty! Believe it or not -- there is rich island history and culture to be explored and several excellent locations to learn more about this beautiful island, its first inhabitants and the "newcomers" who changed the shape and history of the island of Kauai over the years.

                                                     

 Kilohana

 One of Lihue's most splendid structures, Kilohana -- the former plantation home of the Wilcox Family -- is a mecca of activity and points of interest all situated in one convenient location. A Rum Factory, an old plantation train tour through this working farm -- complete with picnic and fruit picking -- a five-star restaurant, a spectacular weekly luau, and shops galore can all be found at Kilohana. Call 245-5608 or visit the website at http://www.kilohanakauai.com/  Kilohana is located on Route 50 next to Kauai Community College.

Grove Farm Museum

The 100-acre Grove Farm site preserves the earliest surviving set of domestic,  agricultural, and sugar plantation buildings, furnishings and collections, surrounding orchards and pasturelands in Hawaii. This homestead was the center of operations for the developing sugar plantation and involved the relationship of family life, plantation activity, household work, gardening and farming which continue as a part of the experience of visiting Grove Farm today.

As the American Civil War was raging between the North and the South, young George Wilcox took a lease on a struggling farm located on the outskirts of Lihue, on the island of Kauai, in what was then the kingdom of Hawaii. The farm had been chopped out of a large grove of kukui trees and was therefore called Grove Farm. His vision combined with his education resulted in his ability to change this arid farm into a thriving sugar plantation. As the Civil War destroyed the agriculture in the South, it helped sugar become a successful venture in Hawaii. Sugar’s success was also favored by the Hawaiian monarchy as it was an additional source of income for it’s kingdom.

For a tour of Grove Farm or more info see their website at http://www.grovefarm.net/ or call 245-3202

Kauai Museum

 

 

 Located on Rice Street in Lihue across from the bank of Hawaii is one of Kauai's best cultural and historical treasures -- The Kauai Museum. Here, exhibits of all things Hawaiiana and historical are presented in aesthetic surroundings.

 

The primary exhibit of interest to those seeking an better understanding of Kauai’s history is called “The Story of Kauai”( two floors of exhibits in the Rice Building)
On the first floor, walk through a passage highlighting geological wonders of the island, its natural history, and the coming of the Hawaiian people. Portraits of famous chiefs from ancient times overlook beautiful examples of Hawaiian culture. Captain James Cook, traders, and whalers lead up to the second floor and the sugar plantation exhibits. Walk through our life-size camp house exhibit and discover the many people from many nations that came to make Hawai‘i their home. Kauai’s missionaries, sugar barons, schools, politicians and more make up the remaining exhibits finishing with Territorial Period and World War II. Videos about the island can be viewed in the Ruth Knudsen Hanner Media Room.

The Kauai Museum is open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM - 5 PM. For more information call 245 - 6931,